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Bennett Myers
Bennett Myers

How to Use Massive v1.3.0 MAC OSX-ASSiGN: A Complete Guide for Beginners



Introduction




Massive is a software synthesizer that uses wavetable synthesis to generate sounds. Wavetable synthesis is a technique that involves playing back short samples of waveforms, called wavetables, at different speeds and positions. By changing the wavetable, you can create different timbres and harmonics. By modulating the wavetable position, you can create dynamic and evolving sounds.




Massive v1.3.0 MAC OSX-ASSiGN



Massive has three main oscillators, each with over 80 wavetables to choose from. You can also use a modulation oscillator, a noise generator, and feedback to add more sonic complexity. You can then shape the sound with two filters, four envelopes, four LFOs, two performers, two steppers, four macro knobs, and various effects. Massive also has a flexible routing system that lets you connect the modules in different ways.


Massive is a popular synthesizer for many genres of electronic music, especially bass music and dubstep. It can produce powerful and expressive sounds that cut through the mix. It also has a user-friendly interface that makes it easy to use and customize. Whether you want to use the presets or create your own sounds from scratch, Massive can help you achieve your sonic goals.


Oscillators




The oscillators are the sound sources of Massive. They generate the raw signals that are then processed by the filters and effects. Each oscillator has a wavetable selector, an intensity knob, an amp knob, a pitch knob, and a mode selector.


Wavetable selector




The wavetable selector lets you choose the wavetable for each oscillator. You can click on the drop-down menu and browse through the categories: Basic, Analog/Electric, Digital/Hybrid, FX/Chords, and Vocal/Phase. You can also click on the arrows on either side of the menu to cycle through the wavetables.


Each wavetable has a unique combination of waveforms that create different sonic characteristics. Some wavetables are simple and smooth, while others are complex and harsh. You can preview the wavetables by clicking on them and listening to how they sound.


Intensity knob




The intensity knob controls the position of the wavetable playback. By turning the knob left or right, you can change the waveform that is played by the oscillator. This affects the timbre and harmonics of the sound.


For example, if you choose a wavetable that has a sine wave on one end and a sawtooth wave on the other end, turning the intensity knob will morph between these two waveforms. You can also modulate the intensity knob with an envelope or an LFO to create dynamic changes in the sound.


Amp knob




The amp knob controls the volume of each oscillator. By turning the knob up or down, you can adjust the level of each oscillator in relation to each other. This affects the balance and mix of the sound.


For example, if you want to create a thick and layered sound, you can turn up all three oscillators and choose different wavetables for each one. If you want to create a simple and focused sound, you can turn down or mute some of the oscillators and choose a single wavetable for one of them.


Pitch knob




The pitch knob controls the tuning of each oscillator. By turning the knob up or down, you can change the frequency of each oscillator in semitones or cents. This affects the pitch and harmony of the sound.


For example, if you want to create a detuned sound, you can turn up or down some of the oscill Mode selector




The mode selector lets you choose the playback mode for each oscillator. You can click on the drop-down menu and choose from four options: Spectrum, Bend, Formant, and Modern.


Each mode has a different effect on the wavetable playback and the sound quality. You can also adjust the mode parameters by dragging the crosshair in the display window.


  • Spectrum mode plays back the wavetable as it is, without any changes. This mode is good for pure and clean sounds.



  • Bend mode bends the wavetable in different ways, creating variations in the waveform shape. This mode is good for adding character and movement to the sound.



  • Formant mode shifts the formants of the wavetable, creating vowel-like sounds. This mode is good for vocal and organic sounds.



  • Modern mode adds additional harmonics to the wavetable, creating rich and complex sounds. This mode is good for metallic and digital sounds.



Filters




The filters are the sound shapers of Massive. They remove or boost certain frequencies from the sound, changing its tone and character. Each filter has a type selector, a cutoff knob, a resonance knob, a mix knob, and a feedback knob.


Type selector




The type selector lets you choose the filter type for each filter. You can click on the drop-down menu and choose from 12 options: Lowpass 4, Lowpass 2, Highpass 4, Highpass 2, Bandpass, Double Notch, Scream, Daft, Comb, Acid, Sinus Shaper, and Parabolic Shaper.


Each filter type has a different frequency response and sound quality. You can also modulate the filter type with an envelope or an LFO to create morphing sounds.


  • Lowpass filters remove high frequencies from the sound, making it darker and smoother.



  • Highpass filters remove low frequencies from the sound, making it brighter and thinner.



  • Bandpass filters remove both low and high frequencies from the sound, leaving only a narrow band of frequencies in the middle.



  • Double Notch filters remove two bands of frequencies from the sound, creating a phasing effect.



  • Scream filters add distortion and resonance to the sound, making it more aggressive and gritty.



  • Daft filters are similar to lowpass filters, but with a warmer and fatter sound.



  • Comb filters add comb-like peaks and notches to the sound, creating a metallic and flanging effect.



  • Acid filters are similar to lowpass filters, but with a sharper and more resonant sound.



  • Sinus Shaper filters add sine wave modulation to the sound, creating a wobbling effect.



  • Parabolic Shaper filters add parabolic wave modulation to the sound, creating a squelching effect.



Cutoff knob




The cutoff knob controls the frequency at which the filter starts to affect the sound. By turning the knob left or right, you can change the amount of filtering applied to the sound. This affects the brightness and clarity of the sound.


For example, if you use a lowpass filter, turning the cutoff knob to the left will make the sound darker and more muffled. Turning the cutoff knob to the right will make the sound brighter and more open. You can also modulate the cutoff knob with an envelope or an LFO to create sweeping and pulsing sounds.


Resonance knob




The resonance knob controls the amount of feedback or emphasis at the cutoff frequency. By turning the knob up or down, you can change the sharpness and character of the filter. This affects the color and texture of the sound.


For example, if you use a lowpass filter, turning the resonance knob up will make the sound more resonant and nasal. Turning the resonance knob down will make the sound more smooth and natural. You can also modulate the resonance knob with an envelope or an LFO to create peaking and growling sounds.


Mix knob




The mix knob controls the balance between the two filters. By turning the knob left or right, you can change how much of each filter is heard in the output. This affects the complexity and richness of the sound.


For example, if you use a lowpass filter in filter 1 and a highpass filter in filter 2, turning the mix knob to the left will make the sound more low-passed and bassy. Turning the mix knob to the right will make the sound more high-passed and trebly. You can also modulate the mix knob with an envelope or an LFO to create morphing and blending sounds.


Feedback knob




The feedback knob controls how much of the output signal is fed back into the input of each filter. By turning the knob up or down, you can change the amount of feedback applied to each filter. This affects the distortion and saturation of the sound.


For example, if you use a lowpass filter in filter 1 and a highpass filter in filter 2, turning up the feedback knob for filter 1, you will make the sound more distorted and crunchy. Turning up the feedback knob for filter 2, you will make the sound more saturated and warm. You can also modulate the feedback knob with an envelope or an LFO to create overdriven and fuzzy sounds.


Modulation




The modulation is the sound movement of Massive. It adds variation and expression to the sound by changing its parameters over time. Each modulation source has a type selector, a shape selector, a rate knob, an attack knob, a decay knob, a level knob, and a loop mode selector.


Type selector




The type selector lets you choose the modulation source type for each slot. You can click on the drop-down menu and choose from four options: Envelope, LFO, Performer, and Stepper.


Each modulation source type has a different way of generating modulation signals. You can also assign the modulation sources to different parameters by dragging and dropping them on the modulation destinations.


  • Envelope sources generate modulation signals based on the envelope shape and settings. They are good for creating amplitude, filter, and pitch changes that follow a specific pattern.



  • LFO sources generate modulation signals based on the LFO shape and rate. They are good for creating rhythmic, cyclic, and random changes that repeat over time.



  • Performer sources generate modulation signals based on the performer grid and curve. They are good for creating complex, sequenced, and musical changes that can be synced to the tempo.



  • Stepper sources generate modulation signals based on the stepper grid and level. They are good for creating simple, stepped, and quantized changes that can be synced to the tempo.



Shape selector




The shape selector lets you choose the modulation signal shape for each source. You can click on the drop-down menu and browse through the categories: Basic, Analog/Electric, Digital/Hybrid, FX/Chords, and Vocal/Phase. You can also click on the arrows on either side of the menu to cycle through the shapes.


Each shape has a unique waveform that creates different modulation effects. Some shapes are smooth and continuous, while others are sharp and discontinuous. You can preview the shapes by clicking on them and listening to how they modulate the sound. Rate knob




The rate knob controls the speed of the modulation signal for each source. By turning the knob left or right, you can change how fast the modulation signal changes over time. This affects the rhythm and sync of the modulation.


For example, if you use an LFO source, turning the rate knob to the left will make the LFO slower and more gradual. Turning the rate knob to the right will make the LFO faster and more abrupt. You can also sync the rate knob to the tempo by clicking on the sync button and choosing a note value.


Attack knob




The attack knob controls the attack time of the modulation signal for each source. By turning the knob up or down, you can change how long it takes for the modulation signal to reach its maximum level. This affects the onset and smoothness of the modulation.


For example, if you use an envelope source, turning the attack knob up will make the envelope slower and softer. Turning the attack knob down will make the envelope faster and sharper. You can also modulate the attack knob with another modulation source to create dynamic and expressive modulation.


Decay knob




The decay knob controls the decay time of the modulation signal for each source. By turning the knob up or down, you can change how long it takes for the modulation signal to drop from its maximum level to its sustain level. This affects the duration and shape of the modulation.


For example, if you use an envelope source, turning the decay knob up will make the envelope longer and more sustained. Turning the decay knob down will make the envelope shorter and more decayed. You can also modulate the decay knob with another modulation source to create dynamic and expressive modulation.


Level knob




The level knob controls the level of the modulation signal for each source. By turning the knob up or down, you can change how much modulation is applied to each destination. This affects the depth and intensity of the modulation.


For example, if you use an LFO source, turning the level knob up will make the LFO more pronounced and noticeable. Turning the level knob down will make the LFO more subtle and gentle. You can also modulate the level knob with another modulation source to create dynamic and expressive modulation.


Loop mode selector




The loop mode selector lets you choose the loop mode for each source. You can click on the drop-down menu and choose from three options: Off, Loop, and Trigger.


Each loop mode has a different effect on the modulation signal playback and restart. You can also adjust the loop length by dragging the loop markers in the display window.


  • Off mode plays the modulation signal once and then stops. This mode is good for creating one-shot modulation effects.



  • Loop mode plays the modulation signal repeatedly and continuously. This mode is good for creating sustained modulation effects.



  • Trigger mode plays the modulation signal repeatedly and restarts it every time a note is played. This mode is good for creating synced modulation effects.



Effects




The effects are the sound enhancers of Massive. They add extra depth and dimension to the sound by applying various processing techniques. Each effect has a type selector, a dry/wet knob, and two parameter knobs.


Type selector




The type selector lets you choose the effect type for each slot. You can click on the drop-down menu and choose from 17 options: Classic Tube, Tele Tube, Hard Clipper, Sine Shaper, Parabolic Shaper, Brauner Tube, Modern Tube, Tape Saturator, Bit Crusher, Sample & Hold, Frequency Shifter, Flanger Positive, Flanger Negative, Phaser Positive, Phaser Negative, Delay Synced, and Delay Unsynced.


Each effect type has a different sound quality and function. You can also modulate the effect type with an envelope or an LFO to create morphing effects.


  • Classic Tube adds tube-like distortion and warmth to the sound. It is good for adding analog character and harmonics.



  • Tele Tube adds telephonic distortion and noise to the sound. It is good for adding lo-fi character and grit.



  • Hard Clipper adds hard clipping distortion and crunch to the sound. It is good for adding digital character and edge.



  • Sine Shaper adds sine wave shaping distortion and squelch to the sound. It is good for adding dynamic character and movement.



  • Parabolic Shaper adds parabolic wave shaping distortion and squelch to the sound. It is good for adding dynamic character and movement.



  • Brauner Tube adds brauner tube-like distortion and warmth to the sound. It is good for adding analog character and harmonics.



  • Modern Tube adds modern tube-like distortion and warmth to the sound. It is good for adding analog character and harmonics.



  • Tape Saturator adds tape-like saturation and compression to the sound. It is good for adding vintage character and glue.



  • Bit Crusher reduces the bit depth and sample rate of the sound. It is good for adding digital character and aliasing.



  • Sample & Hold applies random sample and hold modulation to the sound. It is good for adding digital character and glitch.



  • Frequency Shifter shifts the frequency of the sound up or down by a fixed amount. It is good for adding digital character and dissonance.



  • Flanger Positive applies positive flanging modulation to the sound. It is good for adding phasing character and movement.



  • Flanger Negative applies negative flanging modulation to the sound. It is good for adding phasing character and movement.



  • Phaser Positive applies positive phasing modulation to the sound. It is good for adding phasing character and movement.



  • Phaser Negative applies negative phasing modulation to the sound. It is good for adding phasing character and movement.



  • Delay Synced applies synced delay modulation to the sound. It is good for adding echo character and rhythm.



  • Delay Unsynced applies unsynced delay modulation to the sound. It is good for adding echo character and space.



Dry/Wet knob




The dry/wet knob controls the balance between the dry and wet signals for each effect. By turning the knob left or right, you can change how much of the effect is heard in the output. This affects the subtlety and intensity of the effect.


For example, if you use a delay effect, turning the dry/wet knob to the left will make the delay more subtle and less noticeable. Turning the dry/wet knob to the right will make the delay more intense and more noticeable. You can also modulate the dry/wet knob with an envelope or an LFO to create dynamic and expressive effects.


Parameter knobs




The parameter knobs control the specific settings for each effect. By turning the knobs up or down, you can change how the effect behaves and sounds. This affects the character and quality of the effect.


For example, if you use a flanger effect, turning the first parameter knob will change the feedback amount, which affects how much of the flanged signal is fed back into the input. Turning the second parameter knob will change the phase offset, which affects how much of the flanged signal is shifted in phase. You can also modulate the parameter knobs with an envelope or an LFO to create dynamic and expressive effects.


Macros




The macros are the sound controllers of Massive. They allow you to assign and control important parameters with macro knobs. Each macro has a name field, a range field, a value field, and a modulation amount field.


Name field




The name field lets you name each macro for easy identification. You can click on the field and type in any name you want. You can also use descriptive names that reflect the function or purpose of each macro.


For example, if you assign a macro to control the cutoff frequency of a filter, you can name it "Filter Cutoff". If you assign a macro to control the intensity of a distortion effect, you can name it "Distortion Amount". Naming your macros will help you remember what they do and how to use them.


Range field




The range field lets you set the minimum and maximum values for each macro. You can click on the field and drag up or down to adjust the range. You can also use numerical values that match the parameter values.


For example, if you assign a macro to control the cutoff frequency of a filter, you can set the range from 0 to 127, which corresponds to 0 Hz to 20 kHz. If you assign a macro to control the intensity of a distortion effect, you can set the range from 0 to 100, which corresponds to 0% to 100%. Setting the range for your macros will help you control the parameter values more precisely and avoid unwanted extremes.


Value field




The value field lets you set the current value for each macro. You can click on the field and drag up or down to adjust the value. You can also use numerical values that match the parameter values.


For example, if you assign a macro to control the cutoff frequency of a filter, you can set the


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